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Mayan Apocalypse 101 + Why These Theories On How The World Will End Won’t Happen

Mayan Apocalypse 101 + Why These Theories On How The World Will End Won’t Happen

4:12 a.m. Mountain Standard Time on December 21 marks the conclusion of the 5,125-year “Long Count” Mayan calendar, or the 13th b’ak’tun (a measurement of time – about 393 years.) 

The Mayan apocalypse predictions arise from a misunderstanding of the ancient Maya Long Count Calendar. December 21  just so happens to be the 13th b’ak’tun in the calendar, a benchmark the Maya would have seen as a full cycle of creation (13 was an important number for them.) 

In other words, the Maya had a cyclical view of time and would not have seen the end of their calendar cycle as the end of the world.  Think of the Mayan calendar like our calendar: When you reach the end, you flip over a page and start a new calendar.

Mayans themselves reject any notion that the world will end. Even the oldest Maya calendar painting ever discovered includes calculations of 17 b’ak’tuns

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END OF THE WORLD THEORIES & WHY THEY WON’T HAPPEN:



HIDDEN PLANET COLLIDES WITH EARTH
NASA says there is no evidence that Nibiru (a planet that’s predicted to have a catastrophic celestial collision with Earth), exists and no, it’s not hiding behind the sun.

WEIRD PLANETARY ALIGNMENT OR FLIPPING OF MAGNETIC POLES

NASA rejected apocalyptic theories about unusual alignments of the planets (this has happened in the past, and in any case, any impact on Earth would be negligible), or that the Earth’s magnetic poles could suddenly “flip.”


COMET CRASHES INTO EARTH
Comets that cause destruction on Earth are extremely rare – they could happen once every 500 million years. We would have seen it by now. Yes, even if it lost it reflective “ice” – NASA still tracks ‘dark’ comets.


MASSIVE SOLAR STORM DESTROYS ALL COMMUNICATIONS & BLACKS US OUT
“Solar storms are relatively common events,” says Chris De Pree, a professor at Agnes Scott College. At most, if that happened, we’d see some power outage & a disruption of communications.